Year 1, Week 30: Update on Lymphoma Treatments

1:30

Another good week. Winter definitely feels on its way out, it is gradually getting warmer and the days longer.

I made it to my monthly lymphoma support group. I am starting to wonder whether the first hour format really works as well as it should. The introductions – ‘Hi, my name is X, and I was diagnosed with ______’ becomes repetitive for most of the regulars, and typically takes 20-30 minutes for the 20 or so people there (some provide more detail on their treatment than others ….). We will have a discussion at the June meeting of next year’s program of meetings, and I may raise my wish for shorter introductions (name plus diagnosis and year of diagnosis – that allows people to have the essentials and link up with people who share their diagnosis, and allow time for more discussion on topics of interest). If any of you readers out there have some suggestions, either based on your own support groups or otherwise, this would be appreciated.

The second part was a presentation on some of the most recent studies and trials presented at the American Society of Hematology conference last December by one of our hematologists. Apart from the details on the various results provided, she made a number of interesting comments:

  • Conference presentations provide the high level results but it is only once the papers are published that a fuller and more complete understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the trials are known;
  • Initial findings showing dramatic difference in outcomes for different treatments may be less so once one looks at which patients received which drug (i.e., the randomization may not have been perfect);
  • While as patients we focus on outcomes, hematologists are equally pleased with results that demonstrate equal outcomes with less side effects; and,
  • Ottawa is more involved in trials and research than what I had expected, with the treatment regimens following the latest trial results closely.

BendamustineShe highlighted a number of trials, focussing on those for indolent lymphomas and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL):

  • Bendamustine trials show that Bendamustine combined with Rituxan is ‘not worse’ than Rituxan-CHOP regimens, with some side effects less severe. There is not yet sufficient data regarding longer-term outcomes but Bendamustine is being used given knowledge to date. See also Treatment Considerations in MCL.
  • For mantle cell lymphoma, European study continues to demonstrate the alternating R-CHOP/R-DHAP (equivalent to R-Hyper CVAD which I had) plus auto stem cell transplant provides better results than just R-CHOP plus auto stem cell transplant. R-Hyper CVAD continues to be the preferred first regime for younger patients.
  • BTK inhibitors (or Ibrutinib) continue to show promising results for CLL and B-cell lymphomas, with fewer side effects and risk factors. More trials combining Ibrutinib with chemo are underway. Ibrutinib is also being tested with older MCL patients, with a 65 percent response rate. And Ibrutinib is easier to administer – just a daily pill. See also ‘Highest response rate ever reported’ in relapsed mantle cell lymphoma.
  • For large B-cell lymphomas, a comparative trial between GDP (gemsitabine, desamethazone, cisplatin) and DHAP ( dexamathazone, cytarabine, cisplatin) shows that the former is better tolerated, with comparable effectiveness. to the highlights of the trials:
  • Rituximab administration subcutaneously (by a needle) works as well as by iv. 5 minutes instead of two hours!

In other news, no tears for Hugo Chávez  (but sympathy to his family), even if I recognize his symbolic importance to the poor in Venezuela, as he gets my cancer denialism award of the year. Not sure whether it reflects his dictatorial tendencies, general male trait not wishing to show vulnerability, or ‘machismo’ but I think most of us with a ‘touch of cancer’ knew this was coming a year or more ago.

downton abbeyNo movies this week but we have been watching season 1 of Downton Abbey which we had missed. As with all first seasons, more fresh than subsequent ones and more tightly written, even if some of the plot twists and turns are not credible. However, it is  helpful to have the back story now, as well as appreciating just how impressive the weaving of stories and characters is, and the mapping that must have taken place to make it all fit together, even if in the end is basically high brow soap opera.

 

About these ads

6 thoughts on “Year 1, Week 30: Update on Lymphoma Treatments

  1. ‘Hi, my name is X, and I was diagnosed with ______’

    I read that and the first things I thought of was “ritual.” Rituals are by their very nature repetitive and they serve us well sometimes because they are psychologically soothing. The nice things about a simple format like the one above is that it’s so easy for a newcomer to join in immediately. For the oldtimers, it’s a formula that says, “I claim my space here” and “I renew my affiliation to this group and it’s greater purpose.” For that reason, one has to be really careful about changing them. It can be very destabilizing for everyone.

    Does that mean that rituals can’t or shouldn’t be changed? No. But how you do it is really important. AA has a nice concept that they refer to as the “group conscience.” It’s nothing so simple as a vote – it’s more like a general consensus that the group arrives at after listening to what everyone has to say on whatever is being proposed. I think the key here is “listening” and making sure that those who might not like your proposed changes don’t feel bullied into going along with the louder voices calling for change. My .02.

  2. Thanks, very helpful as usual. I was planning to float it as a question, asking whether others found the current ritual (well-put) helpful or whether they were also wondering. And see where the discussion goes from there ….

  3. I was so intrigued by the report showing Rituxan by injection is as effective as getting it by infusion. It takes about 4 hours for my infusion now, which is certainly not awful and gives me a chance to do some reading, but I would love to be able to “drop by” and get my injection before heading to work – wow. :)

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s