Reproducing scientific studies: A Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval – Slate Magazine

A good initiative to improve the quality and reliability of studies, through the encouragement of replicating or reproducing studies (a number of studies have shown that many landmark studies cannot be repeated, casting doubt on their findings). Quote:

Here’s how it is supposed to work. Let’s say you have found a drug that shrinks tumors. You write up your results, which are sexy enough to get into Nature or some other big-name journal. You also send the Reproducibility Initiative the details of your experiment and request that someone reproduce it. A board of advisers matches you up with a company with the experience and technology to do the job. You pay them to do the job—Iorns estimates the bill for replication will be about 10 percent of the original research costs—and they report back whether they got the same results.

Why would you do this? For one thing, you’ll get a second paper out of the experience, and scientists are judged in part by the number of papers on their CV. Scientists often find it hard to publish replication studies. Iorns had to send her SATB1 paper to a number of journals before getting it published, despite the fact that it revealed that investigating SATB1 for a cancer cure would be a waste of time. The journal PLoS ONE has agreed to publish any study that comes out of the Reproducibility Initiative.

Reproducing scientific studies: A Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval – Slate Magazine.

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